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David Strike

Born in the UK, David Strike's earliest memories are of diving and divers. Entranced by the stories told to him by his uncles - one a commercial 'hard hat' diver, the other a Royal Navy Clearance Diver - his burning ambition was always to become a diver. His formal entry into diving began in 1961 when he joined the British Sub-Aqua Club, followed two years later by qualifying as a Royal Navy diver. During two shipboard postings to the Far East ('64 - '65 and again in '68 -  '69) he had the opportunity to dive many of the locations that have, today, become popular diving destinations. In 1966 he was posted to Malta, on detached duty from the Royal Navy, where he worked with Dr John Woods in photographing and studying Thermocline characteristics.

On leaving the R.N. he completed a refresher course at the legendary, Siebe-Gorman works before joining a consortium of ex-military divers working on the North Sea gas and oil platforms. During the early seventies the mortality rate among the North Sea offshore diving community was reaching alarming proportions. Following two 'near misses' - and attracted by the prospect of warmer waters - he and his family migrated to Australia.

In 1974 he began teaching recreational diving and until recently was a former PADI, SSI Instructor Certifier and ANDI Instructor. He continues to dive regularly and is particularly fascinated by the advent of 'Technical Diving'.

Today he and his wife live in Sydney where he writes about all aspects of diving and dive travel. A regular contributor to a number of diving publications, he is co-convenor with Richard Taylor of the OZTeK Diving Technologies Conference.


 

By David Strike Up until the 'sixties, the major advances in diving technology were driven by big budget, military programmes. Extending the depth limits to which a diver might safely go - and still be capable of performing meaningful work when he got there - had a practical purpose. Submarine rescue and recovery was the incentive behind the series of Deep Diving trials conducted by the British Admiralty during the 'thirties, 'forties and 'fifties. Setting…
By David Strike Sometimes it's easy to forget that diving's meant to be fun and something to be enjoyed. Particularly when you find yourself trapped in the confines of a small dive boat with a group of people who attract misfortune, and who then attempt to explain it all away with nuggets of folk-wisdom drawn from a seemingly inexhaustible supply of proverbs and cliché. 'I'm sorry about that', said Krabbmann, quickly removing his size twelve…
By David Strike An activity that only a decade ago was widely considered to be beyond the scope and purpose of recreational diving, technical diving has now come in from the cold to play a leading role in the development of programmes and practices that have opened up a whole new world of exciting underwater discoveries and possibilities. Although still regarded as a niche component of the recreational diving market, the demand for technical diving…
By David Strike I've always held the word '˜No' in high regard. Apart from its structural simplicity it's always stood by me like a good friend when I've considered myself at risk in the face of questions like, 'Was it you who put live frogs in the lavatory bowl?' or, 'Would you care for a second helping of boiled broccoli and burned liver?' But despite this status as the most important term that folks can…
By David Strike According to a statistical survey that I read somewhere or other forty percent of the world's adult population are, at any one time, actively engaged in the search for a suitable partner while another forty percent are anxiously trying to remove themselves from a relationship turned sour. Not that this has any direct bearing on diving, but as any person who has spent time observing otherwise happy and compatible couples will attest,…